Improving health and social care systems – are we forgetting something?

I’m writing this as a patient, parent, potential service user and change professional.  I  wonder anxiously what impact the latest round of NHS and social care reform will deliver, against the current political background.

My biggest anxiety is, will I and my friends and family be understood and actually helped, when we interact with the health and social care system?  Can professionals change their behaviour, and win time with patients, to understand and help them help themselves? Continue reading

Positive peer pressure and positive deviance

Peer pressure is really powerful.  The trouble is, it can be used for good or bad.  We aim to create positive peer pressure to achieve change, but it’s not always easy. Continue reading

Sustainable results from hidden solutions

Not business as usual

I read Jane Bozarth’s excellent article on positive deviance (PD) in Learning Solutions Magazine with interest.  She succinctly highlights how PD uncovers hidden solutions and delivers sustainable results.  She points up the differences between PD and business as usual.  She sets out the usual scenario for solving problems:

“Organization has a problem.  Organization brings in “experts” to study the problem, devise a solution, run a pilot (which may mean a training program) and then leave.  Organisation members quickly revert back to old behaviors”.

Jane highlights the possibilities opened up by looking for what works.  A specific tool is the all-important “flip” or “somersault” question:

  • Not “why are staph infections so high across the hospital?” but “why are staph infections lower on the third floor?”
  • Not “why are sales down in regions 6 and 9, but “why are sales up in region 4?”

This helpful introduction highlights how simple the PD concept is, and how there are almost always hidden solutions.   On the face of it, it’s hard to understand why amplifying positive deviance, as practised by the Sternins, isn’t as common as many other improvement initiatives.  It’s about doing more with less, empowering and engaging people.  It spreads behaviours and practices that are already proven to be working, so the only resource needed is the time to find them.  It’s evidence based, teaches a lot about leadership and is fun to do.  What’s not to like? Continue reading

Ownership not buy-in – Hidden Insight of the season

People will take personal responsibility for solving a problem,  completing an action and performing better if they own the solution – a key Hidden Insights principle is “ownership not buy-in”.

Hidden Insights® achieves this through its group coaching approach.  Coaching works with anyone, in organisations, families, or communities.  Coaching is reported by the 2015 CIPD employer survey to be the second most effective learning after learning on the job (which is also a part of Hidden Insights). Continue reading

Unusual suspects do extraordinary things – presentation at the Social Policing Unconference

Audrey Asamoah and Jane Lewis’s TEDx-style presentation at the Greater Manchester Police and Fire Services’ Social Policing Unconference showed how Hidden Insights® community facilitation delivers big behaviour change in unlikely places  – most recently in a deprived part of North London.  We  shared some of stories and techniques – which enable both community members and professionals to move past “baggage” and  suspicion and share hope, skills, leadership and aspiration in a very different relationship, learning life and work skills in the process.

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Contribution to new book – chapter on positive deviance

NEW!!  Read Jane Lewis’s article in the Change Leaders‘ first publication!

The Change Leaders new book
The Change Leaders new book

“The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes” – Marcel Proust

The Change Leaders alumni group celebrates 10 years of the Oxford-HEC master’s programme, Coaching and Consulting for Change with their own perspectives on change.  Jane has collaborated with Roberto Saco to tell the story of positive deviance and how it is evolving to help deliver change in the workplace.

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Positive deviance in Paris – key learning points

Jane makes a point
Jane presenting – courtesy of Cecile Demailly

The first day of this year’s Change Leaders conference in Paris was devoted to positive deviance (PD) – an update on new case studies and what’s been learned since the sad passing of Jerry Sternin.   Denis Bourgeois, one of the former programme directors of the Consulting and Coaching for Change master’s programme, cited PD’s development as an important innovation to come out of the  programme.  Denis described PD as a “crack in the wall,” opportunistic approach to change, rather than a “bulldozer” approach.  But it’s not all “touchy-feely” as it is challenging and evidence-driven.

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PD user group endorses social value of positive deviance!

For the first time, representatives of nearly all the UK users of positive deviance met together in Westminster for a round-table debate on the value of positive deviance, and learning points from the exercises so far to carry forward into future projects.

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Indonesian positive deviance link to Woodward Lewis!

Whilst doing some research on what is going on in the world of Positive Deviance, we were really delighted to find that some of our blog posts have been reproduced on the website of the Positive Deviance Resource Centre, Faculty of  Public Health of the University of Indonesia.

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Complexity, positive deviance and pecha-kucha in Paris

Attended another great meeting of the Change Leaders, the alumni group of the Coaching and Consulting for Change programme of Oxford University and HEC Paris.  The group is growing, cohort by cohort, and we are getting world-leading speakers.  In this case, we had the privilege of Margaret Wheatley‘s presence for a whole day, in which she updated us on her latest thinking about complexity.

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