Recognition for Sussex Youth Emotional Support

Julie Tidbury, of West Sussex County Council, used Hidden Insights principles in setting up the new Youth Emotional Support Service (YES) back in 2013. 

She said that the focus on HOW services should work, and the importance of detail, was invaluable.  Also, the training shifted her viewpoint,  seeing things from the perspective of the young person, not the professional.  She used the training activities with her team so that they understood.  After local pilots in her area, the new service design got £3m funding from the local CCG.  It has been a success county-wide, with over 2,500 referrals annually.

The Youth Emotional Support (YES) team was nominated as a finalist in December’s Children and Young People Now awards, which celebrate the achievements of professionals who work with children and young people around the country.  It was runner-up in the mental health and well-being category.

The Hidden Insights training focuses on:

  • Seeing through the eyes of people with the issue
  • Listening, sharing and questioning to get consensus around the issues, and to discover existing solutions
  • Building on what people can already do, working together for mutual support

The detail of what works is really important – in the case of one young person, the fact that their youth worker bought them hot chocolate, with chocolate sprinkles, and met in neutral place built rapport and trust.  This kind of detail was fed into the design of YES.

Read more at: https://www.worthingherald.co.uk/news/health/west-sussex-youth-mental-health-support-team-nominated-for-national-award-1-8745022

Watch Julie talk about her experience here or read and download the case study.

 

Behaviour change around troubled families – building relationships and resilience

The Department of Communities and Local Government’s Troubled  Families Initiative (TFI) was set up to reduce the significant costs to the taxpayer of a minority of deeply complex families.  The DCLG has calculated that one family can cost between £40,000 to £400,000 a year in reactive interventions. There have been some great achievements in turning families round.  The Initiative is now being extended into phase 2. Continue reading

Haringey extends Hidden Insights work to build community resilience

Woodward Lewis have been training Haringey Council and partnership agency staff in using Hidden Insights to tackle problems and to build better, more collaborative relationships, within existing resources.  The contract has just been extended into three new areas:

  • Helping the community to collaborate to address anti-social behaviour in Northumberland Park, N17
  • Helping vulnerable families to adjust to being more self-sufficient when leaving intensive support in N15 and
  • Helping young people leaving care to take responsibility and adapt to being more independent, with the support of personal advisers.

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PD user group endorses social value of positive deviance!

For the first time, representatives of nearly all the UK users of positive deviance met together in Westminster for a round-table debate on the value of positive deviance, and learning points from the exercises so far to carry forward into future projects.

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Indonesian positive deviance link to Woodward Lewis!

Whilst doing some research on what is going on in the world of Positive Deviance, we were really delighted to find that some of our blog posts have been reproduced on the website of the Positive Deviance Resource Centre, Faculty of  Public Health of the University of Indonesia.

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Complexity, positive deviance and pecha-kucha in Paris

Attended another great meeting of the Change Leaders, the alumni group of the Coaching and Consulting for Change programme of Oxford University and HEC Paris.  The group is growing, cohort by cohort, and we are getting world-leading speakers.  In this case, we had the privilege of Margaret Wheatley‘s presence for a whole day, in which she updated us on her latest thinking about complexity.

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People have the internal wisdom to change their lives when given the right encouragement and resources

A recent article by Eleanor Mill’s in The Sunday Times, ‘Done heroin, had a kid, now she’s hooked on finding a job’ made an incredibly inspirational read. A lady named Jane, who grew up in a family that has depended on benefits for generations, and who found herself spending a decade on heroin ‘just existing,’ is in the process of turning her life around for the better.

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