Recognition for Sussex Youth Emotional Support

Julie Tidbury, of West Sussex County Council, used Hidden Insights principles in setting up the new Youth Emotional Support Service (YES) back in 2013. 

She said that the focus on HOW services should work, and the importance of detail, was invaluable.  Also, the training shifted her viewpoint,  seeing things from the perspective of the young person, not the professional.  She used the training activities with her team so that they understood.  After local pilots in her area, the new service design got £3m funding from the local CCG.  It has been a success county-wide, with over 2,500 referrals annually.

The Youth Emotional Support (YES) team was nominated as a finalist in December’s Children and Young People Now awards, which celebrate the achievements of professionals who work with children and young people around the country.  It was runner-up in the mental health and well-being category.

The Hidden Insights training focuses on:

  • Seeing through the eyes of people with the issue
  • Listening, sharing and questioning to get consensus around the issues, and to discover existing solutions
  • Building on what people can already do, working together for mutual support

The detail of what works is really important – in the case of one young person, the fact that their youth worker bought them hot chocolate, with chocolate sprinkles, and met in neutral place built rapport and trust.  This kind of detail was fed into the design of YES.

Read more at: https://www.worthingherald.co.uk/news/health/west-sussex-youth-mental-health-support-team-nominated-for-national-award-1-8745022

Watch Julie talk about her experience here or read and download the case study.

 

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